The cotton kingdom


The cotton kingdom

Item Information

Title:
The cotton kingdom
Description:
During the antebellum period, cotton was considered “king“ in the South, as it was the region’s predominant cash crop. Cotton cultivation began in coastal South Carolina, but with the invention of the cotton gin in 1793, spread rapidly as far west as Texas. Requiring fertile soil and an extensive growing season, there was a northern geographic limit to cotton cultivation. This boundary is suggested by the “mean summer temperature“ line on this detailed statistical map delineating the major areas of cotton production. Published by Brookline resident Edward Atkinson, this map was one of many documents about cotton that he authored. An executive officer for a number of Boston area textile factories, Atkinson was also an ardent abolitionist and wrote numerous tracts advocating cotton cultivation with free labor.
Creator:
Atkinson, Edward, 1827-1905
Name on Item:
compiled by Edward Atkinson.
Date:
[1863]
Format:
Maps/Atlases
Location:
Boston Public Library
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Collection (local):
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center Collection
Subjects:
Cotton trade--Southern States
Slavery--Southern States
Southern States--Maps
Places:
Southern United States (area)
Publisher:
Boston, Mass : s.n.
Notes:
Includes map and statistics relating to crops, temperature, population, etc.
"Boston, Mass[.] March, 1863. Compiled by Edward Atkinson."
Extent:
1 sheet ; 53 x 42 cm.
Language:
English
Identifier:
06_01_006560
Call #:
G3860 1863 .A85
Barcode:
39999059026565
Terms of Use:
No known copyright restrictions.
No known restrictions on use.