Complete map of the rail roads and water courses in the United States & Canada


Complete map of the rail roads and water courses in the United States & Canada

Item Information

Title:
Complete map of the rail roads and water courses in the United States & Canada
Description:
As sectional tensions increased during the late 1850s, there was rising sentiment among the southern states advocating secession. However, the spark that ignited the secessionist movement was Republican Abraham Lincoln’s victory in the Presidential 1860 election. Fearing the loss of their rights as slaveholders, seven states seceded and formed the Confederate States of America with Jefferson Davis as President. Originally published in 1859, this rare railroad map was overprinted to show the first states to secede. The initial boundary of the Confederacy is marked by a heavy red line. Also depicted is the first flag of the Confederate States of America, the Stars and Bars. It was placed over the state of Alabama, signifying Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy.
Creator:
Charles Magnus & Co
Date:
[1859]
Format:
Maps/Atlases
Location:
Boston Public Library
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Collection (local):
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center Collection
Subjects:
Railroads--United States--Maps
Railroads--Canada--Maps
Waterways--United States--Maps
Waterways--Canada--Maps
Telegraph lines--United States--Maps
Telegraph lines--Canada--Maps
United States--Maps
Places:
Canada
United States
Publisher:
New York : Charles Magnus & Co.
Notes:
Also shows electric telegraph lines in operation.
Shows only a portion of southern Canada.
Shows wood block print of the first national Confederate flag overprinted on map and marks the boundary of the early Confederate states.
"Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1859, by Charles Magnus & Co. ..."
Extent:
1 map : hand col. ; 36 x 47 cm.
Scale:
Scale [ca. 1:5,800,000].
Language:
English
Identifier:
06_01_006531
Call #:
G3701.P3 1859 .C43
Barcode:
39999059026383
LCCN:
2001623437
Terms of Use:
No known copyright restrictions.
No known restrictions on use.